Cambodian Water Project of Massachusetts

To make a gift to the Cambodian Water Project through PayPal, please use this button:

 

In March 2003, Amherst, MA residents Sokha and Ny Mao traveled back to their home country of Cambodia – a home that they left as young children during the “Cambodian Holocaust” of the late 1970s. During their visit, they were struck by how poor health and sanitation conditions have remained since the war. Many villages, including Ny’s home village, still had no source of clean, potable water or even sanitary facilities, and as a result, villagers were chronically ill.

Cambodian_Water_ProjectSokha and Ny arrived back to their adopted home, the US, with a vision for improving these conditions and reached out to friends and neighbors to assist them. These friends and neighbors eventually become the nucleus of a new project by serving on the Board of Directors and volunteering for the Cambodian Water Project of Massachusetts.

The goal of this project, as it began, was to create clean sources of water as well as adequate sanitation facilities to prevent the contamination of new water supplies. Depending upon the size of the village and the soil type in the region, these facilities included a combination of wells and/or small reservoirs, along with low water use toilet systems. The Cambodian Water Project has focused its efforts on the small villages of Omani, Onk, Pursat, Kaodak, Prey Totand, and Troh Pan Chann. Local villagers carry out much of the work using locally available technology and all donations have gone directly to supporting these efforts.

With time, the Cambodian Water Project has also begun to broaden the types of projects in each village to reach beyond water and sanitation. New projects and focuses have been proposed by the villagers and endorsed by the project’s Board. These have included projects relating to education, irrigation and food production and economic development.

By working to improve the basic infrastructure of villages in Cambodia, the Cambodian Water Project of Massachusetts is moving forward a movement for peace and social justice.  The Peace Development Fund is proud to be able to support the work of the Massachusetts-Cambodian Water Project through our Fiscal Sponsorship Program.

If you would like to learn more about the work of the Cambodian Water Project please contact Mary (mary.sayer [at] gmail [dot] com)  or Claude (claudetellier [at] riseup [dot] net).

Cambodian Water Project Update

Check out these photos of the all the different work being carried out by the CWP.

Ang Village children's school garden. A dug well built in the schoolyard makes it possible for students to keep a school garden to feed themselves and their families.

Ang Village children’s school garden. A dug well built in the schoolyard makes it possible for students to keep a school garden to feed themselves and their families.

Omany Village. Pit toilets, with two tanks and a vent, last for years and serve one or several families. A contractor installs the tanks and the families build their own shelter. Cost is $80 per toilet. Toilets prevent contamination of surface water, protect people’s health, and improve the comfort and dignity of daily life.

Omany Village. Pit toilets, with two tanks and a vent, last for years and serve one or several families. A contractor installs the tanks and the families build their own shelter. Cost is $80 per toilet. Toilets prevent contamination of surface water, protect people’s health, and improve the comfort and dignity of daily life.

Dug pond Sonapiep Village. Ponds capture and hold rainwater where soils are heavy and wells won’t work. This pond near the Thai border will provide an alternative to the polluted nearby river. Berms protect the water from livestock and surface runoff. CWP has funded six ponds in three villages.

Dug pond Sonapiep Village. Ponds capture and hold rainwater where soils are heavy and wells won’t work. This pond near the Thai border will provide an alternative to the polluted nearby river. Berms protect the water from livestock and surface runoff. CWP has funded six ponds in three villages.

Ang Village family well. Concrete cylinders are made in the village to line hand-dug wells that reach groundwater at about 30 ft. This design is simple, long-lasting, holds up during the dry season, and serves several families.

Ang Village family well. Concrete cylinders are made in the village to line hand-dug wells that reach groundwater at about 30 ft. This design is simple, long-lasting, holds up during the dry season, and serves several families.

Water testing Ang Village. Arsenic contamination of wells is a problem in Cambodia. Visiting students from Marlboro College work with Rith, head monk at Ang Pagoda and others in the village to use a water testing kit. Our dug wells were found to be free of arsenic.

Water testing Ang Village. Arsenic contamination of wells is a problem in Cambodia. Visiting students from Marlboro College work with Rith, head monk at Ang Pagoda and others in the village to use a water testing kit. Our dug wells were found to be free of arsenic.

Omany Village English Classes. English classes, taught in early morning and evening outside the regular school schedule, offer young people a chance to learn a skill that opens up many job opportunities. CWP has funded English teachers and school supplies.

Omany Village English Classes. English classes, taught in early morning and evening outside the regular school schedule, offer young people a chance to learn a skill that opens up many job opportunities. CWP has funded English teachers and school supplies.

Ang Village Sewing Classes.

Ang Village Sewing Classes.

Read our blog

Like us on FacebookFind us on FlickrFollow us on TwitterWe're on Google+Find us on YouTube

Like us on FacebookFind us on FlickrFollow us on TwitterWe're on Google+Find us on YouTube
News updates